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20120930
20121008
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 110 (some duplicates have been removed)
. there is a widespread perception of inproprietary in this case. i believe it should be delayed until after the election. this has been a political campaign and there has been a lot of misconduct to go around. i believe that the domestic violence advocates themselves are engaging in illegal conduct when they come and testify here. they are 501(c)(3) tax exempt organization and to give them tax exempt status they should not be advocating for or against any candidate for public office and they have had the gall to come here and say ross mirkarimi should not be sheriff and i believe is misconduct on their part. i think you should therefore seriously consider delaying deliver your report to the board of supervisors until after the election. thank you. >> my name is barbara tangari and i want to speak to the there is a cultural thing here and what you saw in the video, she was very emotional at that point. and you didn't take it as well, this is actual fact and blah blah. she is latina and i understand, because i happen to be half latina, born in honduras and i understand it very well. i hope i am not sayin
-citizen members of san francisco to vote in city elections. in your opinion, which city elections, if any, should be open to participation by non-citizen residents and which non-citizen residents should be allowed to vote in those elections? >> the harsh reality is that so many non-citizens still have children in our public schools here in san francisco, throughout the state of california and throughout the united states. as all of you undoubtedly know. with that being said, it's vitally important that those parents still have a say in the education of their children. i would certainly support and promote voting by those parents in school board elections in san francisco. by implication own a community college election would fit in that rubric, to support college advancement to people who have traditionally been put at the margins of our society. in those two elections, i think, are the most fundamental in the sense that they go to the root of advancement in this country and the obtaining of the american dream. so the school board and community college board i would certainly support that. >> t
. this district election is really important. i am proud to be here. this is a great organization. we have nine candidates and hello everyone. it's a pleasure to see everyone in the beginning and hopefully they remember me later. the way it will work is the candidates will have one minute that you submitted. i have four questions to start with, plus the league will have their own questions and we invite you to get your questions and someone will get them. the questions have been submitted on the leauge of women voters website and every candidate is going to answer every question, so now we have time keepers. our time keepers, our lovely time keepers are out in front here and they will hold up a yellow card to signify to the candidates have third seconds remaining and a red card when it's time to stop and we ask that everyone be respectful,y -- no booing and no hissing and we want to stay on the time line and you have important decisions to make on november 6 so this will give you an opportunity to have your candidates heard. all right. so we're going to begin -- it's alphabetical orde
. are our elected officials making policy decisions that are sustainable? that promote equity? or are they for-sale to the highest bidder? these are the things that we need to address, otherwise you will have the exact same problems of people asking for more and more people and creating a city where there is very wealthy and very poor people. so i would like to give a quick shout out in that direction to supervisor olague, who is having the san francisco housing authority try to film its meetings. it doesn't even meet at city hall and this is the kind of inequity i'm talking about. we need accountability. so i appreciate that and we need that. thank you. >> thank you, mr. everett. >> i'm the type the progressive who grieves believes that we're only as wealthy as the least among us. so means that in san francisco we can only go as far as the african-american young men and women who have been economically disadvantaged for generations here in the city. we need to provide jobs. with when we talk about green jobs of future and sustainable produce, we need to talk about how to
and get results and i have been effective as elected official for eight years and i will bring that into the board of supervisors. thank you very much. >> i am bob squarey. i live in san francisco. the 49ers were founded in 46 in my honor. i want to thank them -- [laughter] i will be given my season tickets up when i leave the city. i had them for over 40 years. they're gone but with that said i started two successful businesses in san francisco. i have a childrens' foundation "one children at a time inc." and did jobs around the world and every nickel i raised go to helping the kids. i will bring a strong budget control initiative to san francisco and i will show it by opening my district office in either on ocean avenue, lake side, and out of the money they give i will take a part of that fund and pay for that office in san francisco, but i will open it in the district so i will serve the people. bob squirey. i appreciate your support. >> thank you. mr. rogers. >> i am glen rogers and a native son of san francisco. i went to school here wanting to do public service
that in my opinion district seven needs a progressive in this upcoming election i believe i'm that person. i came in second in 2008. i am the only candidate up here that ran in 2008. garnered 19% of the vote and i came in second, and i believe that we need to make our city affordable again for working people, the middle class people. it's not an affordable place to live anymore for most working people so that is something i will work on. and i will oppose major land use development because i believe it's a threat to the preservation of our neighborhoods. it's gentifies our city and it makes it basically a hostile place to live in my opinion especially living out in park merced so if you have a progressive on november 6 vote for me. thank you. >> thank you. ms. gavin. >> i am lynn gavin and i'm a pastor and like so many women there are multiple things that i do and we multi-task and kind of boring even though we didn't term that world. i am running because of the corruption and malfeasance at city hall. i got involved and i was angry they didn't disclose to me they wanted to demolish m
school. >> that is right. >> now you have two elections behind you, one as mayor as well. it's just amazing. you have another one -- how long are you mayor? >> four-year term. >> so you have three more years? >> yes, and then re-election. >> and you want to get some stuff done and some of that is around innovation. and you have called this the innovation capital of world. >> unabashedly. >> i have seen the banner at the airport. >> oh, gosh of course. >> tell me about your plans >> when i was inaugurated in january, i had gone through pretty intense re-election and talked to technology and business world and i had a mission, because out of that campaign and out of listening and be part of tech crunch and thank you for all being here. we have a great conference for the city. i announced a 17-point plan that included making sure that we stayed on top of being the innovation capital of the world. what does that mean? it means that we take advantage of the companies that are here, the technology companies that are here, to help us improve our city. to help us find solutio
, fighting against discrimination. when he became the first asian- american elected to be in that position, that was less than three months ago that the mayor was sworn in. he took every opportunity to encourage went in. -- women. among the list of qualified candidates, he elected supervisor olague. [applause] when he had the opportunity to appoint someone to the position which he formerly held as the chief administration officer of the city and county of san francisco, he immediately nominated -- to be our cao. we are living in a city that and we are very lucky. we know that women around the world are not as lucky. in san francisco, we have many departments that are headed by women. we are very proud. i am looking forward to the next few years. we are very fortunate to have someone who believes in making room for women at the table. i would like to invite shelley bell to join me in presenting this award. [applause] >> thank you. thank you very much for this very -- it is very much appreciated. i am sitting here listening to the introductory remarks, and i have flashbacks. it begins with h
pleasure to introduce the president elect of the bar association of san francisco. they provide conflict attorneys to handle cases when a defender is not available. >> i am the president elect of the bar association. we're very proud to co-sponsor the justice of it. on behalf of the 8000 members, and all of those who -- dedicate their careers -- we are very fortunate to have his leadership with top-notch legal representation. for those who were charged each year who are innocent. an important part of the mission is providing equal access to justice. this is shared by his office and all the public defenders. we're proud of the conflict panel that he described, and we also provide the top-notch representation in matters that his office cannot handle. we applaud you for what you do and for those of you who could not make it, thank you very much. this year's public defender simon will be an interesting day, full of cutting edge issues. gang violence and brain science and crime, these are issues at the forefront and deserve all of our attention. this is a greatat>> your going p with me becaus
, different ways of power in cars. you heard that these are fully elected vehicles. the need to bring this into a holistic approach. what we have been doing under our solutions for the i brand, we have m brand, which is the most powerful actor in the alphabet. those products are well known. but the i brand is just coming. those vehicles are well into development now. the i 3 and i8 will be launched next year. they are carbon fiber and that will be made, not in this state, but just up the way in washington state. using fully environmentally sustainable energy. carbon fiber prevention will be shipped to our factories in europe or will be make carbon fiber cars. it is about 50% like you're than steel, 20% lighter than allen minium. you need the batteries ms. -- which makes the efficiency much more credible and also a strong business case. this part of the united states will play a strong part in the development of these vehicles. as well as we also started a venture firm. the venture fund operates out of new york. it started 15 months ago, we made our first investment in a company called
and voting in elections. >> susan b. anthony dedicated her life to reform. >> suffrage in the middle of the 19th century accomplished one goal, it was diametrically opposed to this idea. >> many feared it would be corrupted by politics. >> women in the 19th century had to convince male voters that having the vote would not change anything. that woman would still be devoted to the home, the family, that they would remain pure and innocent, that having the vote would not corrupt them. >> support gradually grew in state and local campaigns. >> leaders like ellen clark sgt come repeatedly stopping these meetings -- , repeatedly stopping these meetings as a politically active figure. doing everything they could to ground the campaign in domesticity. >> despite their efforts, the link made it tough whenever voters were in the big city. a specialist in francisco. >> the problem with san francisco is that women's suffrage as an idea was associated. >> susan b. anthony joined the provision party. a deadly idea in san francisco. liquor was the foundation of the economy. and >> anything that to
court of appeals for the second circuit. interest include election law, administrative law, statutory interpretation, constitutional law and property and natural resources law. he is a resident of san francisco's mission district. we are honored to work chris almendorf. [ applause ] >> thank you very much and thank you to all of the candidates who are here today. we're very fortunate to be joined by six candidates and what i hope will soon be seven. all of the candidates have agreed to ask their supporters to be respectful of other candidates and the audience and to maintain quiet during the forum. i ask you to respect that commitment. every aspect of this forum will be equally fair to all participating candidates. as everyone here knows candidate debates are often limited to latitudinal appears and personal attack. our debate focuses on critical areas of policy disagreement among the leading candidates. so this end the league of women voters of san francisco and the san francisco public press working with researchers at uc davis, developed an issue position survey for the supervisor
heads and elected officials. i know i've seen some of you here. thank you for coming out to support the fund workover our city employees. it is a privilege to me in particular to be here because i have had the opportunity for the last several years to be on the selection committee for the good government awards. it is really a treat. as a human-resources director, i get a lot of bad news. some of that gets in the newspaper. with all due respect to our brethren in the press, it's always a good story to write about bad behavior that may happen in a city department or that a public employee may have engaged in. we are the largest employer in san francisco. it is only natural as some of that bad behavior may fall on our doorsteps. it is refreshing to see some of the wonderful work people are doing, who really personify the ethos of san francisco. i want to celebrate that. on behalf of the mayor, thank you. please do your part to extend your appreciation to those people. it was a very difficult process. the community members who are involved in the selection process, as we know, we had g
is reorienting our economic polices away from the cronyism, the power elect elite and back to the small businesses. >> i was born and raised in the district. that is not why i think you should vote for me as your supervisor. my entire life was been committed to this district starting when i worked for the mayor where women were trained i know what good social services look like, but i understand that we can't exclude people because they are rich. we can't exclude people because they are middle-class at the expense of making sure we're taking care of one class of people. i worked really hard and there were a lot of people that helped me become the person who i am. sadly, my brother did not make it through. he is in jail now. my sister died from an overdose, and all of this to fight the good fight to make sure that access to opportunity doesn't stop with me. everybody on this panel, we have got some great people and they have made a lot of need to be taken into consideration. but i think that mine experience of not only being on the redevelopment agency commission and working on the fir
mar, who was elected in 2008 and is about halfway through his first term. we will get to know them and talk about the toughest issues they have been facing. welcome, supervisor. thank you for joining us. let's start by talking about your background, where you grew up. >> i grew up in sacramento, california, in the south area. went to public schools. ended up in uc-davis. made my way out to san francisco when i was a college student, and i sat in the class is in san francisco state as well, and i remember growing up at that time around clement street. we call the richmond district the new chinatown in the 1980's at that time. just being around the tremendous unique neighborhood, and discovering san francisco in the 1980's as i grew up, but i also have been very active as a community organizer. i worked in chinatown, and some first jobs also at the mental health center in the richmond area multi services in the 1980's, and i was also a staff are at the chinatown youth center -- i was also a staffer. a lot of my work has been supporting community empowerment, especially in an immigran
the right to vote. >> whether you are marching for a cause or voting in the next election, make your voice heard. thank you for watching. >> hello, and good afternoon. thank you for coming to the industry summit. it is your participation your that makes this work so well. if you look at your program, you will see that our opening speaker is john newlin, president of the entertainment commission. i, however, and not john newlin. i have more hair than john newlin. but i am vice chair of the commission. permit compliance is up. the violence is down. a variety of entertainment is what makes our city great. we will touch on the upcoming party legislation -- party bus legislation and a safe place for our youth to go. after our panel discussion will have some regard groups so we can share ideas and brainstorm. we have a very luminary panel here. right now, i would like to introduce our cheap -- chief of police. [applause] >> good afternoon. i also am not john newlin, and i have less hair than him. [laughter] is a pleasure to be here for the second year. there are fewer people here. that might be
was elected to the board of supervisors in 2008 and reelected in 2010. we will get to know her and talk about the toughest issues facing the city. welcome, supervisor. thank you for joining us. let's start by talking about your background -- where you grew up, what kinds of jobs you have work. supervisor chu: my parents immigrated to the united states about 30 years ago, and i would say that is probably the most formative part of my background. growing up in an immigrant family, you learn many things. my parents raised me in southern california, and i grew up in the restaurant business. they had a small restaurant at the time, and i was there every weekend, working -- well, not working, eating. having a fried egg roll, wanton, something good. it taught me the value of working hard and what it meant to be part of a small business, a small business -- a small business, small family, and an immigrant family at that. really being impacted by the los angeles riots, when that occurred, put me on the path toward public policy and understanding what it meant to have opportunities and not have opportu
to watch. it is of course, in the spirit of the expected national, regional, and state elections we are preparing for. it is also a reminder of the importance of our civic duty and all the different departments we have created. public engagement is extremely important to the way we run government in san francisco. it has always been about public engagement. we need the last bodies come a different viewpoints, different economic classics -- classes, ethnicities, and regions of the city to be well-represented on everything we do because that is what makes our city great. it is that the verse you point coming together to focus -- it is that diverse viewpoint coming together to focus and figure out with the public what it is that we should do, that it is time well, well thought out, and what we need to do to show the rest of the country that this city can work itself out of the economic doldrums and into presenting hope and economic opportunity for everybody, no matter their backgrounds. we also reflect our regional values in this city in many different ways. we want to continue selecti
is in november election. this ordinance has been amended since you heard it; the city will be able to monitor housing production effect of the changing can reinstate the fee for 5-9 units if they chose to them future; with these amendments the ordinance was approved on first reading. there was an appeal of the conditional use authorization for 175 -- sierra blvd., a cu for childcare facility for 15 or more children. at first hearing the president indicated he received a letter from the opponents withdrawing their appeal. no speakers. closed with cu approval intact. as i mentioned last week was the early start date; i saw in a preliminary land-use items; that report will be finalized later this afternoon. i will let you know next week if there's anything that would pertain to us. that concludes my report. >> ms. rogers, thank your for your report. i would going to get some sort of informational report are obviously have a hearing
of your adult life to fighting crime and trying to make communities safer as the elected district attorney of san francisco, you've committed yourself to that, and yet you've broken away from the position held by, i believe, every other elected district attorney in california to support marar district attorney in califoia to support senator leno's direction. why is that? >> i want to thank marty for being here. even though we disagree, i think it was really important to have the point of view of the 57 other elected d.a.'s in the state. i think it's important to understand in our dialogue so marty, thank you for being here. >> thank you. >> marty is someone i respect a great deal and he has been involved in public safety for a number of years and doing very momably serving the l.a. city attorney as well as his current position. actually, for me this has been a journey, it's not like a light switch went on yesterday. i have been involved in public safety for about 30 years. i have seen the war on drugs from the ground up. i have seen it as a police officer, young police officer walking, foo
neighborhood. he was elected to the board in november of 2008 and has served as board president since january of 2009. we will get to know him and talk about the toughest issues facing them. thank you for joining us today. tell us about your background. >> my parents immigrated to the united states in the 1960's. i was the first kid born in the u.s. my parents sacrificed everything so that their kids could have the opportunities that they wanted when they came here. i grew up in the boston area and lived in different parts of boston. i went to catholic price school in dorchester, a section of boston. -- i went to catholic high school in dorchester, a section of boston. because of my parents, my brothers and i were all blessed to go to harvard university. that is where i went to school. it was intense. i stayed there for law school and have a master's in public policy from there. those are subjects i decided to study because i was interested in public service and public policy issues and government. >> you grew up in the boston area. what made you want to make the transition and moved to san f
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 110 (some duplicates have been removed)